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4.3.1.4. Choosing easy-to-use filenames

Linux filenames can be up to 254 characters long and contain letters, spaces, digits, and most punctuation marks. However, names that contain certain punctuation marks or spaces cannot be used as command arguments unless you place quote marks around the name (and even then there may be problems). Linux filenames are also case-sensitive, so it's productive to adopt a consistent naming convention and stick to it.

Here are my recommendations for Linux filenames:

Although it makes command-line file manipulation more awkward, more and more users are adding spaces to photo and music filenames. 

font instead of fonts ); it's less typing, and you won't have to keep track of whether you chose the singular or plural form.

.gif , .txt , or .odt ) are not recognized by the Linux kernel; instead, the file contents and security permissions determine how a file is treated. However, some applications do use extensions as an indication of file type, so it's a good idea to employ traditional extensions such as .mp3 for MP3 audio files and .png for portable network graphics files.


4.3.1.3. Ambiguous filenames | Fedora Linux | 4.3.1.5. Listing the contents of directories