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8.7.2. How Does It Work?

The main system logging utility is named syslog . It is network-based and uses a server daemon, syslogd , which receives messages from all sorts of system programs through the Unix domain socket /var/log . These messages are matched against the lines in /etc/syslog.conf and written to the selected destinations.

Kernel messages are stored in a buffer that is read by a helper daemon named klogd , either by reading the file /proc/kmesg or by using a kernel system call. klogd then forwards these messages to syslogd for inclusion in the system logs.

A syslog network server listens to UDP port 514 and processes any messages received there through the normal routing decisions.

One significant problem with the syslog implementation is that there is absolutely no authentication performed. Any application can log any message with any facility and priority. Therefore it is relatively easy to spoof log messages or to create a denial-of-service attack by sending huge numbers of logfile entries, eventually filling all available disk space and making it impossible to log further events. (For this reason, it is a good idea to use a separate filesystem for /var/log ).

The logwatch and logrotate programs are activated by cron through their entries in /etc/cron.daily .


8.7.1.6. Log rotation | Fedora Linux | 8.7.3.1. ...sending log messages to a program?